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Art Deco Cameras

Kodak Hawkette

Specification

Kodak Hawkette
Kodak Hawkette
Manufacturer: Kodak
Produced: 1930
Classification:Medium Format
Body Type:Folding Strut
Film Type:120
Film Width:62mm
ImageSize:2¼ x 3¼ in
Lens Type:Meniscus
Focus Type:Fixed
Focal Length:90mm
Focal Range:6ft - inf.
Aperture Type:Multihole
Aperture:f/16; f/22; f/32
Shutter Type :Rotary
Shutter Speeds:1/50 sec, B
Size Open (w x h x d):100 x 180 x 117 mm
Size Closed (w x h x d):100 x 180 x 42 mm
Weight:600g

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Description

This was the first plastic bodied camera produced by Kodak. It is constructed from brown bakelite with a mottled tortoiseshell appearance. This model was for premium sales only and it's production took it's lead from the Rajar No.6 camera produced in 1928, also made from Bakelite. These cameras were given away under premium schemes for a number of products including magazines, cigarettes and Cadbury chocolates.

It supports Timed mode and Instant with a speed of about 1/50 sec. It has three aperture settings of f/16, f/22 and f/32 which are changed using a sliding tab.

When buying these cameras, look out for chipped front plates. The bellows of these cameras are also of poor quality and often have pinholes.

How to Use

See Instruction Manual here. This camera takes 120 film which is easily available.

This camera has three aperture settings of f/16, f/22 and f/32 which are changed using a sliding tab. With a shutter speed of only 1/50 sec, make sure you brace the camera against your body or something solid and press the shutter smoothly to avoid camera shake.

If you don't want to bother with an exposure meter, follow the guide below. It is based on the 'Sunny 16' rule. Film is so forgiving and will produce acceptable results even when over-exposed by 2 or 3 stops or under-exposed by 1 stop.

The tables below assume the shutter speed is about 1/50s. If you are not sure about the light level, err on the side of overexposure - i.e. assume the lower light level.

The tables also assume that the sun is at least 30 degrees above the horizon - that's 10am - 5pm on a summers day (May - August) in the UK.

Using ISO 100 Film

Weather ConditionsShadow DetailApertureExposure
Sunny
Snow/Sand
Dark
with sharp edges
Tab Up
f/32
Good
SunnyDistinctTab Middle
f/22
Good
Slight OvercastSoft around edgesTab Down
f/16
Good
OvercastBarely visibleTab Down
f/16
-1 Stop
Underexposed
Acceptable
Heavy OvercastNoneTab Down
f/16
-2 Stops
Underexposed
Not Acceptable
Open Shade
/Sunset
NoneTab Down
f/16
-3 Stops
Underexposed
Not Acceptable

Using ISO 400 Film

Weather ConditionsShadow DetailApertureExposure
Sunny
Snow/Sand
Dark
with sharp edges
Tab Up
f/32
+2 Stops
Overexposed
Acceptable
SunnyDistinctTab Up
f/32
+1 Stop
Overexposed
Acceptable
Slight OvercastSoft around edgesTab Up
f/32
Good
OvercastBarely visibleTab Middle
f/22
Good
Heavy OvercastNoneTab Down
f/16
Good
Open Shade
/Sunset
NoneTab Down
f/16
-1 Stop
Underexposed
Acceptable

Pinhole Issues

Kodak Hawkette
Pinholes in Bellows

See below for images taken with this camera. The film used was Ilford SFX with an ISO of 200. Unfortunately I didn't check the bellows for pinholes before I used it. The results were interesting. Actually they were not just pinholes, someone commented that they were more like Swiss cheese. Actually, I am suprised I got any images at all! If your not sure about the quality of your bellows, keep the camera closed and in its case as much as possible. There was also a lot of dust in the bellows which kept falling on the film. This produced lots of black flecks on the images. I intend to fix the bellows and try again soon.

 

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